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, destroyed 55 homes and damaged more than 120 others. there are growing concerns now that the city of boston is sitting on thousands of underground gas leaks, and several are big enough to set off an explosion like the one in san bruno. molly line live in boss upon -- boston for us now. >> reporter: a new study released by boston university shows they found more than 3,000 leaks, and it raises concerns about everything from air quality to a rare risk of an explosion. there were two explosions across the country earlier this month, one a multistory building that was leveled in springfield, massachusetts, and another deadly blast out in indianapolis reminding all of us of just how powerful natural gas can be. and while the blast here in massachusetts was caused by human error, a pipe that was hit by a drill, the study conducted by boston university raises concerns about the aging infrastructure of one of the nation's oldest cities and just how quickly the old pipes here in boston can be replaced. now, while the majority of leakr nathan phillips and his team found six locations where levels wer
the obama campaign and boston behind the scenes with romney. to the heated battleground states across the country where this election will be decided and our team tracking your vote everywhere in the crossroads of the world with the crowds in times square. and with our partners from univision in miami plus abc's barbara walters, katie couric and our powerhouse team telling you who's winning and why on this historic night, election night 2012, the stakes so high, the race so close, america's next president decided tonight. it's "your voice, your vote." once again from abc news election headquarters in times square, new york, diane sawyer and george stephanopoulos. >> you are looking at times square, usa, the pulse of the nation. also the crossroads of the world, 182 million people pass through here every year and tonight, it is election headquarters for abc news and we are so glad to have you back with us on this very big night, george. >> we have an entire team right out here with us. our reporters an analysts over on that side of the room, jon karl karl, cokie robert, ron brownstein.
, and everybody -- not only at this network, at nbc, abc, cbs, in boston, in austin, all talking about president kerry. that was two hours before the polls closed. >> bob shrum. >> everybody knew that john kerry had won the race. everybody. let me repeat. everybody. two hours before. and then we all remembered what happened in new hampshire when everybody was dancing on hillary clinton's grave. >> oh, my god. >> the day of the new hampshire primary. >> let's look at primary crowds. >> mika and i, we're at a nashua gym and saw hillary up there speaking. >> they were, like, bringing people in from out of state. >> everybody came in from massachusetts. and i said, you know, she deserves a better ending than this. and yet, you never know until americans go into the voting booth and vote. >> well, i recall in new hampshire in february of 2008 being in the lobby of the holiday inn with you and telling you that i had just bumped into lou dellesandrou who was running hillary's campaign. >> and everybody laughed. >> everybody did laugh. that gets to the ultimate magic and mystery that is election day. th
soul searching about the future of the party. as romney said good-bye to campaign staff at his boston headquarters yesterday, republican recriminations were already in full swing. one member of the campaign's finance committee told "the washington post," "everybody feels like they were a bunch of well meaning folks who were to use a phrase that governor romney coined to describe his opponent -- way in over their heads." plenty more republicans were more than willing to go on the record. >> the romney campaign did nothing -- zero -- nothing -- in the last few days to jump-start the governor. >> after that first debate, i don't know where that mitt romney went. i mean in the summertime, he was raising a lot of money and he was on lake winnipesaukee, he was having fun on the jet ski. >> when conservative commentator ann coulter defended romney, ingraham incredulously disagreed. >> if mitt romney cannot win in this economy, then the tipping point has been reached. we have more takers than makers and it is over. >> i'm sorry, this is going to sound cruel, but some of the times i didn't fee
they would do it but i do think that you are hearing stories come out from reporters who were in boston on election night that mitt romney and his team were also very emotional and in a different way. but to a person, you hear stories that both barack obama and mitt romney, these are good men that wanted to do good things for this country and barack obama will have another four years to try to turn things around. >> van jones, i think the reason it struck a chord, i certainly felt genuinely moved by it, is you could certainly see the brutality of these campaigns, what it takes out of people. even barack obama, who has been president for four ice-cold years, suddenly got very emotional, sort of looking at people that were him 25 years ago, on the beginning of their political careers. perhaps one of them may be president one day. it was a pretty profound, in its own way, profound speech of just five minutes or so. >> yeah. well, you know, the ice man leaked. if you weren't moved by that, you have been in politics for too long. in some ways this whole campaign was sort of the return of the
at this school outside boston, an extreme example, was entirely legal. >> some day we are all going to look back and we're going to say, can you believe what we did here? >> reporter: an abc news investigation has found that only 17 states have specific laws protecting students from harsh treatments and restraints. >> that's there's thousands and thousands of children that have been traumatized, that have been injured. >> reporter: in arizona and washington state, parents are up in arms over padded isolation boxes or cells where students have been left for long stretches. in kentucky a mother found her autistic eight-year-old son had been stuffed into a duffel bag like this one, especially made to restrain children. >> they held me. >> reporter: in pennsylvania a group of students with behavioral issues described to abc news how they had been tied up or manhandled at previous schools. did it hurt? >> yeah. it really did hurt. >> reporter: jordan described being locked up in one of the isolation boxes? >> it's scary. really scary. even for the bravest person in the world, it's still really scary.
problems and stop all the nonsense. martha: michael graham, radio talk show host and "boston herald" columnist and he written about this. he joins me this morning. michael, good to have you with us. melissa: my choice is easy. martha maccallum for person of the year. martha: we're done. melissa: i'm kidding. i'm kidding. martha: i could go on and on about my huge impact on 2012. stick with what your column says. go ahead. so you want -- >> i choose bill o'reilly if we're going to do that. martha: i'm sure he will not dispute you there. he will have no argument about that. melissa: i agree with his premise. in a way it is interesting we live in amazing moment. we have $99 trillion of unfunded debt in social security, medicare, government pensions we see there we see the middle east on fire with the rising tide of the most disturbing element in the middle east, that is people who are willing to mix religion and violence together who are on the rise of the saw in egypt with the new constitution. yet in this moment of great import we're talking seriously about gangnam style and jay-z an
and a columnist with "the boston herald", and julie roginsky, former political adviser to frank lautenberg and a fox news contributor. so the washington times comes out with an editorial that says he has no mandate. they say that he is, pointed out that he's the first president since george washington to be reelected with fewer popular votes than he was in the first term and say he's got no mandate. michael, true? >> uh, it's hard to see the mandate of a campaign that seemed to be focused almost entirely on whether or not the republicans were going to break into your home and steal your feminine hygiene products. so i can't really say he ran on this plan to do x, he's going to get it. but i don't think that means he's a lame duck. he has the power of the presidency, it's a very powerful tool. he's got the media, obviously, very cooperative. so let's just say he's a limping duck might be a better answer. megyn: is -- julie, your thoughts. because the point of the editorial is they say he was limping along already and that generally in the second terms presidents don't, you know, their power
hospitalized in boston. the 83-year-old was rushed from his prison cell to a hospital yesterday after complaining of chest pains. bulger, the man who inspired jack nicholson's character in "the departed" is awaiting trial for his role in 19 murders. >>> that is zach potter. inspiring a nation by climbing to the top of chicago's 103-story willis tower. zach lost his leg in a motorcycle accident three years ago. doctors out fitted the 31-year-old with the world's first neurocontrolled bionic leg. he used it to scale the former sears tower in just over 53 minutes. that's incredible. >>> coming up, the economy is a top issue in this election. and president obama has consistently trailed mitt romney on that issue. so what does that mean for tomorrow's election? one of the nation's top economists, larry summers, is going to join us next. harge of . how they'll live tomorrow. for more than 116 years, ameriprise financial has worked for their clients' futures. helping millions of americans retire on their terms. when they want. where they want. doing what they want. ameriprise. the strength o
million worth last year. this place north of boston is more like a lottery lounge. 15 kiosks, plenty of seating and some inspiration. >> this is our latest million dollar winner. >> reporter: this year alone, americans spent $61 billion on lottery are tickets. up 8.7% from 2011. where does all the money go? every state is different, but on average, 58 cents of every dollar goes to prizes. 33 cents are funneled back to state coffers. while most think lotteries fund education, 12 of 44 states use the money solely for that. back in tallahassee, the machines that hold our fate were locked up in a vault. as the sun set on the luckiest place in texas they kept coming. right up until sales stopped just an hour before the big drawing. >> take a look at tonight's numbers. >> reporter: when so many dreams were put to bed. i'm ryan owens in texas. >>> well, for the first time we are hearing from general david petraeus himself about his affair with paula broadwell. petraeus says his wife holly has not kicked him out despite the enormous difficulty he created for her by having the affair. he says
valentine now he's stanford's bright light and the manager threw in boston. i think we have to challenge bobby to join us on this building next year. what do you think, rick? >> all right. >> gretchen: my gosh. and that's where we find our own rick reichmuth. so did valentine take the cash challenge? >> he did. and they already have started. they're just over the wall. i'm going to get going. they're both on the other side here and oh, man. >> gretchen: is this the real thing or practice run? >> you really don't want to look down. >> steve: if you're just joining us, rick is on the top of the 300-foot building. >> brian: 22 stories high. he's going to go down with bobby valentine and brian cashman down this 22-story building. all for a great cause. >> the first step is always the scariest. >> gretchen: is this practice or is this real? >> steve: this is it. >> brian: it's happening right now. >> are you asking? what are you asking if it's practice? >> gretchen: in case you make a mistake. >> steve: no
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)